Is it Worth Getting Printers Repaired For Your New York Business?

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Cost

Is it Worth Getting Printers Repaired? And How Much Does It Cost?

There are a few things you should consider when deciding whether or not to get your printer repaired.

Is the printer worth more than the cost of the repair?

Is the printer still under warranty?

How long will it take for the technician to repair the printer?

We’ll discuss these questions and help you make an informed decision about whether or not to get your printers repaired.

The most common inquiry about printer repair is whether it’s worth it, especially for simple home printers that are relatively cheap to acquire new. If the repair would cost more than half of an unknown printer with comparable features, it’s usually preferable to replace it.

Key takeaways

  • The type of printer determines the costs of repairing a printer and the problem to be addressed.

  • Plus replacement parts, printer repairs usually require 1-2 hours of labor.

  • When repairs cost more than half the price of a printer, they aren’t usually worth it.

Here are other things to consider before deciding whether or how to repair your printer.

Cost per page

Newer printer models are sometimes more efficient or use larger-capacity ink or toner cartridges, resulting in lower page prices. 

If this is the case, upgrading to a newer model may make more sense than repairing your current one. 

To figure out how much it costs to print each page on your old printer, divide the cost of a toner or inkjet cartridge by the number of pages you can print before replacing it.

Lifetime volume

When you print a configuration page, most printer models will tell you how many pages (or “impressions”) have already been published. 

While the maximum potential lifespan varies considerably among printers, many may indicate that your equipment isn’t worth servicing.

How Much Does It Cost to Repair a Printer

The cost of repairing a printer can vary widely depending on the type of printer, the extent of the damage, the availability of replacement parts, and the complexity of the problem.

The average price to get the unit functioning again is $50–200, including parts and labor for a primary repair job; more complex repairs may cost even more. 

Printer repair technicians typically charge $40–100 per hour for work, and they can fix most problems in 1–2 hours.

Given that you can now purchase a competent home printer for less than $100, replacement may be the best option for that class of device.

How much

Is it worth repairing an HP printer?

Eventually, your HP printer may slow down, display errors, or refuse to work. These printing issues impact your work environment with feelings of frustration and reduced productivity.

 When these issues happen, how do you know if you should opt for an HP printer repair service or replace your printer? If you find yourself asking this question, consider the following six factors. 

1. Figure out if your printer is repairable

The first step is to assess whether your HP printer may be restored and, if so, whether it is worthwhile. While technicians can fix most laser printers, some models are exceptions due to a lack of available components.

 Less expensive inkjet printers generally fall into the nonrepairable category. These printers include HP models such as OfficeJet, Deskjet, and Photosmart printers.

 Parts for these machines may not be available, and even if they are, the cost of repairs could potentially be equal to or exceed the cost of buying a printer.

2. Is your machine a laser printer?

If your machine is an HP laser printer and comes with more of an upfront financial investment, then a printer repair service could be a good idea.

 Often, a repair will be less than replacing a new machine, and investment into your HP laser printer could get it back in working order.

3. Consider if you would benefit from an upgrade

Older HP devices are not always to be thrown out because of their age.

Another thing to consider when deciding whether or how to replace or repair your printer is the number of pages the machine has printed throughout its existence. 

A device’s eventual burnout might be influenced by a device’s lifetime volume of pages.

HP is continually improving its printers, featuring more security benefits, faster printing speeds, and technology that could lower the cost of printing. 

Features that make your work environment more efficient and secure may be worth investing in a new machine. 

4. Do you have a bunch of extra HP printer toners?

If you have an overabundance of ink, or toner, it may be in your best interest to repair your HP printer. Even if the repair cost exceeds your printer’s value, that cost will be offset by not having to invest in more ink or toner cartridges.

5. Will the repair cost exceed your HP printer’s value?

When it comes to obsolete HP printers, you should expect the following: If your HP printer costs less than $200 new and you don’t have an overabundance of ink or toner cartridges, you’ll be much better off seeking a replacement.

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Is it cheaper to fix a printer or buy a new one?

It’s usually more cost-effective to invest in a replacement rather than repair an older printer, especially if a new model costs less than $200.

Repairs on higher-end printers may be worthwhile for models costing between $50 and $200, depending on the printer type and fault.

What is the average lifespan of a printer?

The average printer lifespan is determined by the manufacturer, model, and style and how often it is used. Printers in the $100–200 price range can last 3–5 years on average, whereas high-tech printers with advanced features can last 5–8 years.

Four Signs That It’s Time to Buy a New Printer

Although printers have become more reliable in recent years, they still have a limited lifespan.

Most experts recommend replacing a printer every three to five years, although this timeline can vary depending on the model and how often it is used. Here are four signs that it may be time to invest in a new printer:

1. The quality of your prints has decreased

If you’ve noticed that your prints are starting to look faded or blurry, it’s probably time for a new printer. This problem is usually caused by worn-out print heads, which can’t be replaced on most consumer-grade printers.

2. You’re running out of ink frequently

Have you noticed that you have to replace your ink cartridges more often than usual? Frequent cartridge changes can signify that your printer is reaching the end of its life.

3. Your printer is making strange noises

If your printer has started making grinding, clicking, or other strange noises, it’s time to get a new one. These noises usually signal internal damage.

4. The technology is outdated/obsolete

Even if your printer is still working well, its technology is probably outdated. If you want to keep up with the latest printing technology, you’ll need to buy a new printer every few years.

 

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Tips to save money

Here are a few ways to reduce the cost of printer repairs.

  • Check your warranty

    Under warranty, some printers come with a one-year guarantee that covers the cost of repairs or replacement parts if the problem is due to manufacturer defects.

    When an inexpensive printer has a manufacturing defect under warranty, the maker may choose to replace it rather than repair it.

  • Look for discounts

    Many computer and printer repair businesses provide discounts ranging from 10 to 25 percent for students, military personnel, seniors, or other groups.

  • Skip the on-site service call

    If you don’t want to bring the printer to the shop, many printer repair experts can come to your house or workplace for a service call. On the other hand, labor costs may be up to twice as expensive as hourly labor charges in a repair shop, averaging $75–175 per hour.

  • Consider remanufactured parts

    A Third-party company produces these remanufactured parts other than the printer’s original manufacturer and are often known as “generic” or “aftermarket” parts.

    These can be a lower-cost option for genuine equipment manufacturer (OEM) parts when they are accessible.